Mountain Architecture: An Alternative Design Proposal
for the
Wy'East Day Lodge, Mount Hood Oregon

by Thomas P. Deering, Jr.

EPILOGUE

THE WY'EAST DAY LODGE AS BUILT

As stated earlier, it is not the intention of this thesis to focus on the merits of the design of the actual Wy'East Day Lodge, but rather to propose an alternative design based on similar criteria. It is useful however, to see how others approached the problem--albeit with the added constraints of a real budget and actual clients. The following illustrations and description show the Wy'East Day Lodge much as any visitor might experience it.


Figure 7.1: Timberline Lodge and the Wy'East Day Lodge. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. (Postcard by Hugh Ackroyd, Portland, Ore. 79714-D)

Slightly less than four years after the final Environmental Statement, "Timberline Lodge" was issued (October, 1975), construction began on the first of the "proposed actions" described therein--to construct a new day lodge (see Chapter III). The Wy'East Day Lodge, built of cast-in-place concrete, took the next three summers to construct, and by the winter of 1981-1982 it was ready for use. The design was prepared by Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, with Dick Spies as the design architect. The completed structure follows closely the site selection recommended by the Environmental Statement as well as the facilities program described above and in Appendix C. The site actually chosen for the Lodge is a compromise between the specific site recommended by the Environmental Statement ("A"), and site "B", in front of Timberline Lodge (see Figure 3.4). The Day Lodge was built equidistant between them, just west of the creek and on the south side of the road to the upper parking lot (Figure 7.1). With respect to the facilities program, the only substantial deviation is the omission of the employees' dormitories, apparently destined for a later phase.


Figure 7.2: The Wy'East Day Lodge and Mount Hood. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. (Author)


Figure 7.3: The Wy'East Day Lodge. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. Interior of the "Milling-Circulation" space. (Author)

In as much as arts and crafts is an essential part of the character of Timberline Lodge, the inclusion of art in the Wy'East Day Lodge is essential to its character. Since a cast-in-place concrete building can not be itself be construed as a hand crafted structure, all of the hand made items in the Day Lodge are either fixtures, furnishings, or works of fine art--the enameled metal sculpture over the main entry by Bonny Bronson, for example (Figure 7.4). While the Day Lodge was under construction, efforts were underway to solicit additional money for furnishings and artwork. Not long after the Day Lodge was completed, over a quarter of a million dollars had been raised to acquire works of local artists to be placed within, or made part of the Day Lodge. The integration and display of arts and crafts is an ongoing and vital project, and will, in concert with the efforts at Timberline Lodge, continue to be an important auxiliary focus for the Wy'East Day Lodge.

By the author's observation, the Wy'East Day Lodge has substantially fulfilled the requirements of both the Environmental Statement and the facilities program; from a programmatic standpoint, it works well. At this point, nothing has been built to provide the additional overnight accommodations, although the need still exists. It is hoped that further construction at Timberline will take into consideration the points raised by this thesis, with results that are complementary to the magnificence and spirit of Timberline Lodge.


 
Figure 7.4: The Wy'East Day Lodge and Timberline Lodge. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. View from the southeast. (Author)   Figure 7.4 (detail): Enameled metal sculpture over the main entry by Bonny Bronson. (Author)


Figure 7.5: The Wy'East Day Lodge. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. View from the north. (Author)


Figure 7.6: The Wy'East Day Lodge. Broom Oringdulph O'Toole Rudolf & Associates, 1981. The southwest side as seen from the parking lot in front of Timberline Lodge. (Author)


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Master of Architecture Thesis
(M. Arch - University of Washington - 1986)


Extensive copying of this thesis is allowable only for scholarly purposes,
consistent with "fair use" as described in the U.S. Copyright Law.
Any other reproduction for any purpose or by any means
shall not be allowed without my written permission.


Copyright 1986 © Thomas P. Deering, Jr.



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